Schools not warming to climate lesson change

Pupils at Cardinal Allen take on regular green activities, including litter picks and creating an eco garden, to boost their green rating and help the environment.

Pupils at Cardinal Allen take on regular green activities, including litter picks and creating an eco garden, to boost their green rating and help the environment.

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THE Fylde coast’s greenest schools have vowed to continue educating their pupils about environmental issues despite possible changes to the national curriculum.

Draft plans for changes to geography and chemistry lessons, revealed this week, have little or no call for teachers to educate children on climate change.

Pupils at Cardinal Allen take on regular green activities, including litter picks and creating an eco garden, to boost their green rating and help the environment.

Pupils at Cardinal Allen take on regular green activities, including litter picks and creating an eco garden, to boost their green rating and help the environment.

But schools with active eco groups and who have worked to gain green status have said this will not lessen the environmental work they do.

Andrew Harding, who oversees active “eco warriors” at Cardinal Allen Catholic High School, in Fleetwood, said as a church school they feel very strongly about educating youngsters about the environment.

He said: “We’re trying to embed it in our curriculum even more, it’s so important.

“It links in with everything: RE, geography, science, so we’re still keeping on.

“I think it’s important, that’s the future and if we make a mess of the environment there’s nothing left for future generations.”

Draft guidelines for the curriculum of Key Stage One, Two and Three no longer mention climate change for geography teaching and have only one mention of how carbon dioxide emissions impact on nature for chemistry teaching.

Education leaders and scientists have expressed shock and concern over the draft curriculum which is far removed from the current curriculum.

Currently schools must educate children about the interdependence of people and their environment and the impact of that on environmental change.

Mr Harding added: “As a church school we’ve got to think about other people and the environment and how to keep it for future generations.”

The curriculum now also looks at sustainable development in geography lessons, but the draft moves this to chemistry lessons by talking about the “efficacy of recycling”.

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