School told it must improve in every area

Boundary Primary School has been told it requires improvement in every area

Boundary Primary School has been told it requires improvement in every area

  • Boundary Primary School has been given a raft of ratings by independent inspectorate Ofsted in recent years
  • Including being placed in special measures in 2002 but moving up to a ‘good’ status by 2012
  • The school, on Dinmore Avenue, has been given a lower rating and told it ‘requires improvement’
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A Grange Park school which had pledged to be outstanding has been told it requires improvement in every area.

Boundary Primary School has been given a raft of ratings by independent inspectorate Ofsted in recent years, including being placed in special measures in 2002 but moving up to a ‘good’ status by 2012.

Dayle Harrison

Dayle Harrison

That year, then-headteacher Dayle Harrison pledged to have the school achieve the highest rating, outstanding, but he was later moved from his post to take over the then Collegiate High School and the school has since had an acting headteacher.

Now, following a “period of significant change”, including a high staff turnover and a change in governance, the school, on Dinmore Avenue, has been given a lower rating and told it ‘requires improvement’.

Acting headteacher Christina Maddison-Muchlinski said: “We welcome the report’s findings and, while there’s a lot of work on, we are extremely pleased the strengths of the school have been recognised.

“Despite a period of significant change we continue, alongside parents, to help shape pupils into positive role models.”

We welcome the report’s findings and, while there’s a lot of work on, we are extremely pleased the strengths of the school have been recognised

The report, following a visit on March 24 and 25, found:

• The quality of teaching is not consistently good. As a result, too few pupils reach the standards they are capable of.

• Pupils do not always make enough progress because teachers do not give work to them that matches their abilities.

• Pupils’ low-level disruptive behaviour in a small number of classes hinders learning.

The large school has 421 pupils, aged four to 11, many of whom (more than the national average) are considered disadvantaged or have special educational needs.

The school also has two Special Educational Resource Facilities (SERF) for pupils who have behavioural, emotional and social difficulties.

Inspectors did note positives though and say the school was in a good position to improve, noting:

• Pupils are happy and enjoy school. They are kept safe and are very well cared for.

• Leader’s self-evaluation of the school’s strengths and weaknesses is accurate.

Mrs Maddison-Muchlinski added: “We’re pleased the report recognises we are in a positive position to improve and that our pupils are happy, safe and secure.

“There are a number of areas that we need to work on and parents can rest assured that – as acknowledged in the report – we were already aware of our strengths and weaknesses and know what we need to do to improve.”