Rise of coast’s woodlands all down to waste

Cristele Rockall and Kristen Shorrock with pupils from Kincraig School and councillors planting the first shrubs of a 'mini-forest' at Deerhurst Road in Bispham Woodlands from waste.

Cristele Rockall and Kristen Shorrock with pupils from Kincraig School and councillors planting the first shrubs of a 'mini-forest' at Deerhurst Road in Bispham Woodlands from waste.

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The saying goes that mighty oaks from tiny acorns grow.

But the rise of woodlands in Blackpool is down to something entirely different.

A flurry of forests that have been planted recently are actually thanks to Blackpool Council’s waste contract.

The town hall, along with Lancashire County Council and waste technology firm Global Renewables, is planting thousands of trees across the county to offset the carbon emissions created by the recycling private finance initiative.

The trees, paid for through grants from the Forestry Commission, are popping up all over Blackpool, with the latest set of woodlands being planted off Deerhurst Road in Bispham.

Pupils from nearby Kincraig School joined council officers, beaver groups and the local community to plant the town’s newest forest.

The “Woodlands from Waste” project aims to improve Blackpool’s street trees –and it’s hoped more than 30,000 will be planted in the coming years.

The saplings will take around 30 years to grow into full sized trees, providing both aesthetic and ecological
benefits to the area.

Coun Fred Jackson, cabinet member with responsibility for waste, said: “The Woodlands from Waste programme is a great benefit to our waste contract and will provide real benefits to the town.

“Trees don’t just provide a boost to the environment and the air we breathe, but also can transform landscapes and improve the visual appearances of certain areas.”

The Lancashire-wide project aims to plant 2.5million trees and increase woodland in the county by 1,200 hectares before 2032.

A previous Woodlands from Waste project involved Norbreck Primary School pupils planting trees at Mossom fields.

In March 2007, Lancashire County Council, Blackpool Council and Global Renewables Lancashire Ltd, signed what was then the UK’s largest waste PFI contract – a £2bn, 25-year agreement to process the household waste of 1.4m people in Lancashire.

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