Residents’ joy at home veto

Residents of Newton Drive are protesting against plans by the Annacliffe Nursing Home to build a three-storey dementia unit in the back garden

Residents of Newton Drive are protesting against plans by the Annacliffe Nursing Home to build a three-storey dementia unit in the back garden

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PLANS for a dementia care home which sparked fierce opposition have been rejected by the Government.

An application submitted by the Annacliffe residential home, on Newton Drive, to build a three-storey building to accommodate 26 dementia patients, had already been turned down by Blackpool Council.

Now, campaigners, who claimed the development would cause traffic chaos and impinge on their privacy, are delighted the building will not go ahead.

Diane Buckley, manager of the Acorn Nursing Home, said: “The residents were extremely worried about how the building would affect their privacy while they were in their rooms.

“They, and the staff, are very pleased it will not go ahead.”

The planning report, written by Ruth MacKenzie, inspector for communities and local government, said the building would create dark and gloomy surroundings for some residents.

She wrote: “Its high brick walls and mansard roof would be only about 8m from the east-facing rooms in a single-storey rear extension at the Acorn Nursing Home.

“This, to my mind, would give a dark and enclosed outlook which, for those who spend a lot of time in their rooms, could significantly worsen their quality of life.”

The report also says another reason for rejecting the plans was a lack of parking - the plans suggested increasing the number of spaces to 12, but this still fell two spaces short of the number recommended by the council’s parking policy.

Coun Sue Ridyard said: “This is fantastic news for the residents in this area.

“They were very concerned about this scheme for a number of reasons, including their privacy, and they are delighted to hear the appeal will not be going ahead.”

Annacliffe owner Steve Bowe previously claimed the dementia unit would help combat the growing problem of a lack of specialist dementia care.

Recently, the Department of Health issued a plea for people in Blackpool to seek early diagnosis of dementia, estimating almost 50,000 sufferers in the North West remain undiagnosed.

New figures show an estimated 1,953 people live with dementia in Blackpool and of those, approximately 1,195 remain undiagnosed and are missing out on access to the right treatment.