Rainforest saviours are walking the talk

Pupils from Baines Endowed Primary, Station Road, Thornton taking part in a sponsored walk to raise money for endangered animals. L-R Maisie Johnston, Connor Porter, Jacob Southwell, Megan Taylor, Melissa Woods, Mia Bolton and Toni Stead.
Pupils from Baines Endowed Primary, Station Road, Thornton taking part in a sponsored walk to raise money for endangered animals. L-R Maisie Johnston, Connor Porter, Jacob Southwell, Megan Taylor, Melissa Woods, Mia Bolton and Toni Stead.
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SAVING the rainforest is top of the agenda for these determined youngsters.

The Baines Endowed Primary School pupils were so upset to hear about the threat to endangered animals, they decided to take to the streets to spread their message.

The Year Three pupils designed persuasive posters and banners especially for their march from their Thornton school to the Wyre Estuary Country Park and back again.

Nicola McPhee, from the school, said: “After studying the rainforest topic, the children decided they wanted to raise money to adopt an endangered animal at Blackpool Zoo.

“We decided a sponsored walk to the Wyre Estuary Country Park would be ideal and the children produced posters in literacy to tell others about our cause, some of which have been displayed around school.”

The children managed to liven up the five-mile trek with songs and chats and enjoyed a play in the park before heading back to school.

Their efforts meant they smashed their sponsorship target of £150 by raising £259.

Nicola added: “We walked around the fields and stopped for a picnic lunch and a brief play on the park. The children really did walk a long way, without any moans, and livened up the walk with a variety of songs and chants. We were armed with placards and banners as well as T-shirts – all of which the children had designed at home.

“Other children had made collecting tins and lots of parents on the playground plus passers-by on our walk very kindly added in donations.

“We have just arranged for our school to adopt a gorilla at Blackpool Zoo. This will pay for food, water, bedding and medical costs for a whole year.”

The Amazon region is the biggest rainforest in the world and sustains thousands of species and supports more than 30 million people. But, every minute, an area the size of three football pitches is destroyed due to trees being cut down for wood, to clear areas for farming or road construction or to extract minerals.

A representative from the zoo is due to visit the school today to present a certificate and talk to the children about what difference their donation will make.

The pupils were also treated to a visit on Monday from local conservationist Alan Bennett, who spoke to them about the rainforest and how to protect it.