Playwright’s ode to trams

Playwright Howard Kay is staging a play set around the tramway called The Wires are Singing with actors Paul Codman and Benjamin Schereschewsky.
Playwright Howard Kay is staging a play set around the tramway called The Wires are Singing with actors Paul Codman and Benjamin Schereschewsky.
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A playwright who’s made Blackpool his new home is showcasing a work based on his love of the resort’s tramlines.

Howard Kay moved to Blackpool in 2013 after living most of his life in Liverpool.

And for the last two days he has presented the play The Wires Are Singing at his home on the Promenade at North Shore.

The self-confessed ‘tram anorak’ admits his new home on North Promenade, opposite a tram stop, is his idea of heaven.

Howard said: “I’ve always loved Blackpool, since being a kid, and it got to the stage I was spending so much time here, in hotels, that I thought I might as well live here.”

The play is a ghost story set in current times, just before Christmas, and features two professional actors Howard has recruited from Liverpool.

Living in a retirement housing complex, Howard initially wrote the 30-minute play as a piece of entertainment for fellow residents in the communal lounge.

“They have various events through the year in the lounge,” he explained. “I’m not into preparing food or drink, but thought I could do something dramatic.

“I did the play last year and thought this year I would build it up a bit more, from being just a script in hand to a performance.”

Howard thinks his plot and setting are a new take on the tramways, and belives it’s the first time they have featured as the setting in a dramatic context.

“There have been TV and films in Blackpool where you glimpse the trams but something focused on them should be a first.

“It was the idea of a human story. There are two men, one younger one older with this one thing in common - that they’re both conductors on a tram, and it centres on one evening when what they have in common all comes together with a bit of a twist.

“Come the end, the disbeliever you’re not so sure on, but the believer doesn’t know what’s happening.”

Howard hopes the play will be picked up by local hotels for matinee entertainment, and that he will be inspired to write a longer piece based in the resort.

His audience is being made up of fellow residents at Holroyd Court as well as friends and relations.