No raining on our parade

Pupils from Kirkham Grammar School undertook a 20km walk to raise money to support a former pupil left disabled after a hit and run incident.

Pupils from Kirkham Grammar School undertook a 20km walk to raise money to support a former pupil left disabled after a hit and run incident.

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Walking 20 kilometres in driving rain might be seen as too far by most, but it was a piece of cake for these proud pupils who took it in their stride for charity.

The walk undertaken by Kirkham Grammar School pupils was supporting former KGS student, Alastair Carter, who was the victim of a hit and run accident while cycling last year, leaving him paralysed from his chest down.

The incident left him paralysed but he was tough enough to survive the whole ordeal and carry on living his life.

So it was only right that his peers take on their own challenge to help him - raising more than £6,000 for Alastair.

The youngsters from the school on Ribby Road set off from Lytham Green and endured driving rain along the route to Squires Gate and back again.

And one plucky youngster even ran the whole route.

Fran James, from the school, said: “On the morning of the walk, the rain stopped for a couple of hours, but later in the day, pouring rain added to the sense of challenge.”

Determination was vital at this point but fortunately the courageous students were full of it.

To prove this School Captain Ben Everson ran the 20 kilometre course in a remarkable one hour 13 minutes - luckily avoiding the rain, although the other students had to tough it out in the wind and rain to complete the journey.

The event was supported by all members of the schools community along with a number of members of the school’s teaching and support staff, plus a group of Alastair’s friends.

Participants raised thousand of pounds to go towards assisting Alastair with the cost of living with his injuries.

Alastair’s former teacher Mark Gaddes, who organised the walk, said: “There were two aspects to the walk - there’s the difference we can make to his independence, being able to have his flat made accessible, but there’s also that feeling that there’s 500 people to do that for you.

“Hopefully that will have a psychological effect that’s difficult to measure but very important.”

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