Mystery of Harry’s science is revealed

St Bede's pupil Katherine Lee, inspects robots at the RAF Education Roadshow.

St Bede's pupil Katherine Lee, inspects robots at the RAF Education Roadshow.

0
Have your say

LEARNING how Harry Potter’s ‘invisibility cloak’ might work is not something you might expect to pick up from an average day in the classroom.

But for pupils from St Bede’s RC High School in Lytham, that’s exactly what was on the curriculum when they had a visit from the BAE Systems and RAF Education Roadshow.

This year a key part of the show was an explanation of how BAE Systems has developed technologies to give military vehicles their own ‘invisibility cloak’ in the battlefield. The emphasis is to make science, technology, engineering and maths subjects accessible and relevant to young people. Over the next 10 months the initiative will reach more than 25,000 young people from more than 240 schools nationwide.

Year Seven pupil Georgia Collings of St Bede’s said: “You need patience because you will use trial and error to develop some projects and well as having good imagination to create something spectacular.” Nigel Whitehead, group managing director of BAE Systems, said: “An additional 514,000 science and technology professionals will be needed in the UK by 2017 yet almost half of seven- to 11-year-olds described a career in engineering as ‘boring’. I’m convinced that if industry, schools and the Government work together young people could benefit from learning more about science, technology, engineering and maths and the career opportunities these subjects offer.”