Man damaged Blackpool Tower replica

Solid silver model of Blackpool Tower worth �100,000.  Tower Manager Geoff Sage studies the model in the Tower Ballroom.

Solid silver model of Blackpool Tower worth �100,000. Tower Manager Geoff Sage studies the model in the Tower Ballroom.

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A reveller damaged an antique solid-silver model of Blackpool Tower when he flew into a rage.

Joshua Davies lost his temper when he could not get to see his favourite DJ at the Blackpool Rocks dance music night.

He was clearly quite drunk and his recollection of what happened is poor.

Davies charged at the model in its alarmed glass cabinet outside The Tower’s ballroom and hit it with a litter bin.

The model,which was valued at more than £100,000 when it featured on TV’s Antiques Roadshow in 2009, was damaged along with the cabinet and alarm system.

Davies, a 22-year-old engineer, of Beech Avenue, Irlam, Manchester, pleaded guilty to causing £1,655 worth of damage to the model.

He was sentenced to do 80 hours unpaid work for the community and ordered to pay £500 towards compensation with £85 costs plus £60 victims’ surcharge by District Judge Sam Goozee sitting at Blackpool Magistrates Court.

The judge told Davies: “This was drunken loutish behaviour and you damaged a valuable antique belonging to The Tower.”

Pam Smith, prosecuting, said that on December 20 Davies shouted at security staff manning the music event, when he and his friends were refused entry to a room to hear a DJ, because the area was already full.

When interviewed by police Davies said he had drunk beer and vodka before attacking the model and he was in a temper at being refused access to see a DJ.

Howard Green, defending, said: “He was clearly quite drunk and his recollection of what happened is poor. He was upset at being denied entry to see the DJ, having paid for it. He is thoroughly ashamed of his behaviour.”

The 4ft tall solid-silver model of Blackpool Tower was presented by Tower shareholders to company chairman Sir John Bickerstaffe in 1898.