DCSIMG

Kids are learning to write the code of their futures

Two mums are setting up a Coder Dojo with their sons.  Pictured are Jo Culshaw and Jan Whipp with Jospeh Culshaw and Jake Whipp.

Two mums are setting up a Coder Dojo with their sons. Pictured are Jo Culshaw and Jan Whipp with Jospeh Culshaw and Jake Whipp.

If the next Steve Jobs or Bill Gates is in Blackpool, there is a pretty good chance they are working on their computer skills with this lot.

A new computer club for the resort’s youngsters has been set up to help childen learn everything from creating websites to how to write their own code.

Mum Jo Culshaw stumbled on the idea to start the CoderDojo club after looking for something to keep 
her 10-year-old son Joseph busy.

The club, which started in America, has popped up all over the world but the nearest one she could find was in Manchester – so she and friend Jan Whipp decided to take matters into their own hands.

Jo, of South Shore, said: “The club in Manchester was permanently full.

“My son is really into computing so I was looking for something for him to do.

“I found out about CoderDojo and thought we need something like this in Blackpool.”

So she and Jan, whose son Jacob is 10, set up the free club themselves and are looking forward to their first ever session on April 26.

They have enlisted the help of local computer experts to run workshops for kids from the age of four to 17, with classes for beginners and more advanced coders.

Jo added: “My son wants to work for Google or Apple and we even go to the Apple store in Manchester for a day out.

“But I couldn’t find anything to help him pursue it here so I set up the club.”

Les Pounder, of Marton, is among those who has offered his mentoring services to help encourage more young people to learn valuable skills, including HTML coding for websites and Scratch, a visual coding programme designed to help youngsters learn.

The freelance IT consultant said: “This is something I have always been interested in.

“CoderDojo is really another group aimed at getting 
children in coding and computing.

“Coding itself is really great to learn and gives you an employable skill but also the mind-set you need to become a programmer, understanding complex problems quickly, is very useful in business.”

The first meeting of the free club will be in the community room at Tesco Extra, on Clifton Drive, on April 26.

Anyone attending will need to be accompanied by an adult and will need a ticket, available free at www.eventbrite.co.uk

 

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