DCSIMG

Club’s hospital donation is Lee’s legacy

Tyldesley Conservative Club presents �1000 to the haemotology unit at Backpool Victoria Hospital, front from left, Steve Farley, Tyldesley President, Joanne Barks, Blackpool Victoria, Pete Dixon, Tyldesley Past President and Pat Conchie

Tyldesley Conservative Club presents �1000 to the haemotology unit at Backpool Victoria Hospital, front from left, Steve Farley, Tyldesley President, Joanne Barks, Blackpool Victoria, Pete Dixon, Tyldesley Past President and Pat Conchie

Lee Davis-Conchie’s legacy lives on thanks to a generous donation of £1,000 to Blackpool Vic in his memory.

The Tai Chi instructor inspired others when he bravely fought acute myeloid leukaemia for two years, even setting up a support group for others despite going through gruelling treatments himself.

But he lost his battle with the bone cancer in October last year, aged 45, after a bone marrow donation he received just months earlier was unsuccessful.

Now Mr Davis-Conchie, from South Shore, is being remembered through a donation made to Blackpool Victoria Hospital’s haematology unit from Tyldesley Conservative Club.

The club, on Palmer Avenue, South Shore, decided to make the £1,000 donation in his name to support his mother, Pat Conchie, a long-time member.

The gesture is not just Lee’s legacy living on, she said, but also a wonderful display of compassion for her as she grieves her beloved son.

She said: “I felt totally overwhelmed, it’s a wonderful gesture, they said they wanted to do something in Lee’s memory and it’s to support me.

“The support I’ve had from members in the club has been phenomenal.

“A local club supporting the local hospital is a wonderful gesture.”

The club’s president Peter Dixon approached Mrs Conchie to suggest the donation after collecting thousands at the club over the last year.

The money is set to be used to transform an area at the entrance to the unit into a relaxation area for patients.

And Lee would certainly approve, Mrs Conchie adding: “It’s something Lee would have advocated, he wanted an area like this.”

Lee and friend Jez Baugh set up a support group for patients, carers, friends and family affected by any type of blood cancer at the Vic, which continues today, meeting at the Macmillan Unit at the hospital every third Wednesday of the month from 7pm.

He also visited students at Blackpool Sixth Form to share his story and encourage them to sign up to the donor register through the Anthony Nolan Trust, for which he was a poster boy.

Inspired by him, more than 75 teens have since registered as donors and the college has raised hundreds of pounds for the charity.

Mrs Conchie added: “It’s a great legacy for him, I don’t feel his story is finished yet.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page