Life’s a beach for the clean team

From left, Jenny and Pat May, Holly Taylor, Wayne Coughlin, Laura Rudolph, Alice Rudolph and Bruce Goodridge at the St. Annes Sand Bar
From left, Jenny and Pat May, Holly Taylor, Wayne Coughlin, Laura Rudolph, Alice Rudolph and Bruce Goodridge at the St. Annes Sand Bar
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Volunteers rolled up their sleeves to help clean up St Annes beach.

The work was part of a nationwide project to keep Britain’s seashores free of litter and pollution.

Jenny May from St. Annes enjoying a drink of Barefoot Wine from the St. Annes Sand Bar after the Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project

Jenny May from St. Annes enjoying a drink of Barefoot Wine from the St. Annes Sand Bar after the Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project

The Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project has been running for eight years and aims to keep beaches “barefoot friendly” by removing rubbish, such as broken glass and plastics.

On Saturday the volunteers gathered on the beach to begin the big clear-up.

Last year, 800 volunteers removed 1,500kgs of rubbish from Britain’s beaches.

To be selected for the beach rescue project, people from all over the country are asked to send in images of their own beaches to the organisers.

Alexis Byron and Holly Taylor with some of the rubbish cleared from St. Annes Beach during the Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project

Alexis Byron and Holly Taylor with some of the rubbish cleared from St. Annes Beach during the Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project

To reward volunteers for their hard work, life-size sandcastle bars made entirely of sand were created at each of the chosen locations, complete with a Barefoot Wine drinks cabinet for the post-clean party.

Organiser Olga Senkina said: “We are really excited for this year’s Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project and to help clean up Britain’s beaches.

“Our own ‘Barefooters’ were on hand at St Anne’s beach to support the event.”

The project will run across the country throughout the spring and summer in partnership with environmental charity, Surfers Against Sewage (SAS), who, for the last 25 years, have worked to protect the UK’s oceans, waves, beaches and wildlife.

Dom Ferris, projects manager at Surfers Against Sewage, said: “Every year we are blown away by the amount of support from our coastal communities.

“Our aim is to reduce UK beach litter by 50 per cent by 2020, and we’re really looking forward to working with local communities once again this year to make Britain’s beaches cleaner than ever.”

To find out more visit www.twitter.com/BarefootWineUK, and use #BarefootFriendly to follow the nation’s entries.