Help hospice in your will

John Comer's family and friends at the hospice, presenting Trinity with a cheque for more than �245,000 which was left to the charity on his wishes, after his wife Mollie's death in 2010.

John Comer's family and friends at the hospice, presenting Trinity with a cheque for more than �245,000 which was left to the charity on his wishes, after his wife Mollie's death in 2010.

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Trinity Hospice is urging people to consider helping it in their will.

The Bispham-based charity recently received a huge boost, from a wonderful legacy and is highlighting the generous donation and the issue of bequests in its first ever Will Month which runs until the end of October.

Trinity was given more than £245,000, left by Last of the Summer Wine star John Comer, to be left to the hospice on the death of his wife Mollie.

The actor, who died of cancer in 1984, at the age of just 59, had also arranged for his ongoing royalties from Last of the Summer Wine repeats and DVDs to go to Trinity.

Mr Comer, who was buried at Carleton, had left instructions Trinity should get a legacy from his estate when his wife Mollie died. She died in 2010, but after that the money was given to the hospice in a series of instalments through the couple’s solicitors.

Recently, some of Mr Comer’s family came to the hospice to mark the final payment and see for themselves the good work the money was being used for.

Mr Comer – who played Sid the cafe owner in long-running British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine – suffered from throat cancer and was not a patient at Trinity, but was inspired by the establishment and work the hospice did across the Fylde coast.

Heather Jones, legacy fundraiser at Trinity, said Mr Comer’s legacy was a wonderful gift.

“The generosity of John Comer’s family is the perfect example of how a legacy can help Trinity Hospice.

“John, his wife and some friends made an agreement many years ago they would leave some money to Trinity.

“Mollie Comer was the last of that group and this generous legacy came to us when she passed away.

“It was lovely to talk to members of the Comer family, their friends and the solicitor who has dealt with the legacy.

“They travelled from Manchester for the day and we showed them around the hospice, so they could see how the money would contribute to patient care here on the Fylde coast.”

Heather added the generous legacy showed the importance of making a will.

As part of its Will Month, the hospice aims to stress just how important wills are to its vital work and how everybody should make a will.

Heather said: “Having an up-to-date will is so important, but something many people just never get round to arranging.

“We hope Trinity’s first ever Will Month will prompt people to take action and put their affairs in order.

“Without a will, the state can step in to decide who should get what, the result can be considerable upset for family. Taking into account property, pensions and savings, a person’s estate can add up quite a lot, many people are surprised when they stop to think about it.

“Making a will, especially if you have children and grandchildren, can bring real peace of mind. Even if you made a will years ago, it makes sense to revisit it, as family circumstances change.”

Some local solicitors are giving their services for free for Will Month. For more details, visit www.trinityhospice.co.uk/support-us/will-month