This is rubbish... but it shouldn’t be!

Environmentally-friendly children at Holy Family Catholic Primary School, Blackpool, are worried about the waste their free breakfast scheme is creating.
Environmentally-friendly children at Holy Family Catholic Primary School, Blackpool, are worried about the waste their free breakfast scheme is creating.
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YOUNG eco-warriors at a Blackpool school are challenging town hall bosses to help save the planet.

Pupils from Holy Family Catholic Primary School, North Shore, are worried about the waste Blackpool’s free school breakfast scheme is creating.

And to show just how much there is they collected a single week’s worth of empty milk cartons.

The school’s eco council said their sums suggest more than 22,000 non-recyclable cartons are being used in schools across the town every week.

Now they’ve taken their concerns to the top by writing to council leader Coun Simon Blackburn, asking him to ensure the local authority takes responsibility for the rubbish.

In a letter sent to Coun Blackburn, pupils Jasmine Anderson-Shepherd and Maci Fitzmaurice wrote: “As eco warriors we see it as our job to try to stop waste and you are not helping.

“We urgently need you to either change the cartons to recyclable ones or set up a place in Blackpool where they recycle that material.”

The milk cartons are made from material which the eco council said is not recycled in Blackpool.

Teacher Kerry Capoverde said: “Although the free breakfasts are brilliant in many ways, we feel the council has not considered the amount of waste that accompanies it. It is shocking but could be managed with effective recycling and awareness.”

The council has said it will take heed of the children’s comments.

Coun Blackburn said: “I would like to thank these pupils for bringing this matter to my attention.

“It is fantastic they are so committed to improving the environment. Our milk contract is going out to tender shortly so we can see if there are any options other than Tetra Pak cartons.

“Although there is a Tetra Pak collection point at Bristol Avenue tip, there is not a stand-alone collection service in place. I will ask officers to look into the feasibility of arranging one.

“All the rubbish produced by schools goes to the waste transfer station at Thornton, where it goes through an intensive process to ensure as little as possible ends up landfill.”

The children are now being offered a behind the scenes tour of a waste plant to learn about the recycling process.

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