School pledges improvement after tough inspection visit

Baines Endowed

Baines Endowed

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Bosses at a school which has been told it must improve its standards have today said they are “firmly focused” on getting better.

Baines Endowed CE Primary School, in Marton, was told it requires improvement after inspectors Ofsted found expectations weren’t high enough for children and there wasn’t enough good teaching.

New library facility at St John CE Primary School, Blackpool.'Pupils David Lang and Kaela (corr) Warnes read with Head teacher Jo Snape

New library facility at St John CE Primary School, Blackpool.'Pupils David Lang and Kaela (corr) Warnes read with Head teacher Jo Snape

Inspectors who visited the school last month also found that changes to staffing at the school, including new leaders and six new staff starting in September, had been disruptive to progress.

However, the Penrose Avenue school has been told its development plan is on track to see good improvements and that its Early Years provision was strong. Now school bosses have said they are “confident” things are moving forward as teaching is “improving” and pupils are making “better progress”.

Other issues raised include:

– Pupils are not always given clear enough guidance in teachers’ marking about what they need to do to improve their work

– Expectations of what pupils can achieve are not always high enough

– There are too few opportunities for staff to observe outstanding teaching in other schools in order to improve their own practice.

But headteacher Joanne Snape said: “While we are disappointed, we are also confident that we had already identified all areas they mentioned and have put many actions in place to move things forward.

“The biggest concern was our end of Key Stage Two SATs results which have been below national average for the last two years in reading and maths.

“Ofsted recognised that we have an accurate picture of what needs to improve and a clear, firmly focused plan of how to do this.

“They also recognised that pupils are now making better progress across school because the quality of teaching is improving and that particular groups of children, such as those who have special needs, are vulnerable or eligible for pupil premium funding, have made good progress and continue to achieve well.

“We were delighted that Ofsted recognised the strength of our Early Years department both in school and in our 
nursery.

“They also identified children felt safe, behaved well and were very well cared for in school, which again is something we really value.”