Pupils earn their stripes

Pupils and staff at St Teresa's Primary School dress up in stripes as part of anti-bullying week.  Pictured are Jack Connolly, William Brimelow, Jake Norwood and Bradley Frankel.
Pupils and staff at St Teresa's Primary School dress up in stripes as part of anti-bullying week. Pictured are Jack Connolly, William Brimelow, Jake Norwood and Bradley Frankel.
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Schoolchildren made learning about a difficult topic fun – donning stripy clothes and face paint to tackle the issue of bullying.

The youngsters at St Teresa’s Catholic Primary School, Cleveleys, had a colourful schoolday at the culmination of anti-bullying week held last week.

Pupils and staff at St Teresa's Primary School dress up in stripes as part of anti-bullying week.

Pupils and staff at St Teresa's Primary School dress up in stripes as part of anti-bullying week.

The school spent the week doing activities around the book, A Bad Case of the Stripes.

The story follows a young girl whose skin turns stripy when she follows the crowd, pretending to dislike the things she loves in order to fit in at a new school.

David Aaron, Year Six teacher at the school, said: “The moral of the story is to be yourself and not try to just fit in with others.

“The messages of anti-bullying week were we’re all different and unique and we should accept people for who they are.”

Classes from Reception up to Year Six each did different activities based around the book.

Year Three classes took on a role-play, taking on the role of teachers to solve bullying problems.

Sienna Sweeney, eight, said she found the activities useful.

“It solved a friendship problem I had at playtime,” she added.

And in Year Six children looked at bullying from the viewpoint of both the victim and the bully, writing a balanced argument on the point.

William Brimelow, 11, said: “The week has made me look at bullying in a whole new light, raising my awareness of various problems that bullying can cause.”

Inspirational speakers visit Fylde classes

Anti-bullying week was marked at schools and colleges across the Fylde coast.

At Collegiate High School, Blackpool, youngsters met with Stephen Brookes, a lead officer for disability hate crime, and wrote accounts of what bullying means.

And at Myerscough College, Bilsborrow, former footballer turned equality and diversity consultant, Kieron Brady, talked to students about the issue.

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