Learners are inspired by laboratory in a lorry

A lorry converted into a science laboratory visiting the St Geroges high school, Marton.' L-R Phillipa Barber, Thomas Dewhirst, Jake Ratcliffe, Talia Stott and Amy Steedman.
A lorry converted into a science laboratory visiting the St Geroges high school, Marton.' L-R Phillipa Barber, Thomas Dewhirst, Jake Ratcliffe, Talia Stott and Amy Steedman.
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SPARKS flew as lorries rolled into a school playground with a very different delivery for pupils.

Packed with science and engineering equipment to inspire teenagers, the lorry provided a different backdrop for an afternoon’s learning.

Pupils from St George’s School, on Cherry Tree Road, Marton, conducted experiments led by volunteer scientists and engineers.

The group of 11-14 year olds explored science through specially created interactive experiments.

Philippa Barber, 13, from Marton said: “It was really interesting and fun. It brought different equipment that we haven’t seen before in school to teach us new and exciting facts.

“My favourite was pretending to be a surgeon in the keyhole surgery.”

The two 44ft lorries house three distinct laboratory areas, to explore physics, chemistry and biology.

Pupils conducted experiments using light, sound and specialist equipment.

Thomas Dewhirst, 14, from Layton, said: “It was an excellent learning resource to have at the school. I learnt about things I have never learnt about before. I enjoyed making our own sunset on the ceiling and understanding how the sky is blue and how the sun looks yellow even though, in reality, it is white.”

Joanna Young, a science teacher, had organised the visit to inspire an interest in science and engineering.

She said: “The visit generated excitement and curiosity for science by letting pupils explore experimental science for themselves with the help of expert volunteer mentors from the local area.”

Members of the Institute of Physics and the Science and Technology Facilities Council encouraged pupils to ask questions and learn in new ways.

Talia Stott, 13, from Marton, said: “The staff knew a lot of facts and were really interesting to talk to and ask questions. I really enjoyed the demonstration on moving a ball using sounds as I have never seen that before.”

James Bamford, from the Institute of Physics, who organises the lorry visits, said: “Lab in a Lorry generates excitement and curiosity in science by letting young people explore experimental science for themselves with the help of expert mentors.”

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