Kids show they’ve got Scootability

Learning about scooter safety at  Blackpool Council's school travel conference are L-R Abigail Glen, Mia Gleadell and Emma Shipley
Learning about scooter safety at Blackpool Council's school travel conference are L-R Abigail Glen, Mia Gleadell and Emma Shipley
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Scoot aside cars – there’s a better, healthier and more fun way to get to school!

Children across the resort have given a resounding thumbs up to the idea of a new scheme to encourage pupils to take the two-wheeled transport to classes in the morning.

The new Scootability project was launched at Blackpool Council’s school travel conference, held at Blackpool FC’s Bloomfield Road stadium yesterday.

More than 50 children from 14 different resort schools visited the conference and gave the idea their

backing.

Among those there was 10-year-old Dylan Ellis, from Bispham Endowed C of E Primary School, who was keen to share his knowledge about the advantages of scooting.

Dylan, from Holyoake Avenue, Layton, said: “It’s just really easy to learn and your parents can walk alongside while you’re riding it.

“It’s a great thing that you can learn but you need to learn not to go too fast and how to brake properly.”

Fellow Bispham Endowed pupil Alicia Fradgley, nine, also added her support for the idea.

Alicia, from Linden Avenue, Thornton, said: “It’s for all ages and you’re doing exercise because your legs are going round and round.

“They’re better than being in a car.”

The Scootbaility scheme, which will be offered to schools across the resort, is similar to the existing Bikeability cycling proficiency test.

It will involve a 40-minute lesson and children will learn five golden rules for scooting to school.

After this, the pupils will receive a certificate of their achievement.

Schools are also being encouraged to build scooter parks for children to store their vehicles during the day.

Lyndsay Cleary, from the council’s travel and road safety team, said: “It’s quick, it’s convenient, parents can still accompany them and it keeps them active.

“It’s a fun way of getting to school, they’re not an expensive item that children have to have and it also encourages parents to walk to school.

“We want children to have fun but stay safe too.”