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Bringing plant life to a very urban school

Children at Thames Primary Academy, South Shore, have made green spaces in their otherwise urban school - Amber, Raihana and Fenton

Children at Thames Primary Academy, South Shore, have made green spaces in their otherwise urban school - Amber, Raihana and Fenton

Spring has sprung at Thames Primary Academy thanks to the efforts of these young gardeners.

Children at the South Shore school have been hoeing and planting in their school grounds and learning about growing their own fruit and veg then using it in cooking.

Working with environmental not-for-profit Red Rose Forest, the school, behind the Pleasure Beach on Severn Road, has been able to create green spaces for the first time in its otherwise urban grounds.

These children, all six- and seven-years-old, transformed a bed at the school gates to plant fruit trees, herbs and bushes.

The school now also has four tree planter boxes with birch trees in, funded by First TransPennine Express.

Local Food, part of the Big Lottery Fund, has helped to fund two little green roofs on top of sheds, which parents helped to fill with edible plants.

Beth Kelsall, project assistant, said: “We’ve done fruit tasting and a classroom session with every class and are planning some fruit and veg themed cooking classes in May.

“The idea is to introduce the idea of growing your own food.

“Groundwork Blackpool also did a session with teachers about learning to grow from seed.”

Now the school is hoping to be able to plant its own orchard. Work with Red Rose Forest is to continue through the summer.

 

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