A buzz in the classroom!

Graeme Dow, headteacher at Anchorsholme Primary School and (below) staff and pupils in their bee keeping outfits.
Graeme Dow, headteacher at Anchorsholme Primary School and (below) staff and pupils in their bee keeping outfits.
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A Blackpool primary school has received some new residents over the summer break.

A new honey bee hive has been introduced at Anchorsholme Primary School as part of a project to educate children about the species and how important they are for the environment.

Staff and pupils at Anchorsholme Primary School in their bee keeping outfits.

Staff and pupils at Anchorsholme Primary School in their bee keeping outfits.

Inspired by a school keeping bees in London, the project has been initiated by Alan Hulme who manages the Grow Blackpool project for Groundwork.

He said: “I first came across this innovative way of educating children about bees using a hive house when I saw a presentation by the headteacher of Charlton Manor Primary School in London at a community gardens conference back in January.

“On my return I approached Anchorsholme Primary School with the idea and headteacher Graeme Dow immediately saw its potential.

“We visited Charlton Manor School with teaching assistant Debbie Talbot and eight pupils and they kindly showed us their beehives as well as giving the children their first experience of beekeeping.”

Grow Blackpool staff built the hive house and introduced bees to Anchorsholme Primary over the summer break and are now training teachers in beekeeping ready for this school term.

Mr Dow, headteacher at the Eastpines Drive School, said:“This new beekeeping facility will enable pupils to learn about bees relating to many different subjects in a fascinating and stimulating way.

“We hope that harvesting and selling the honey crop will also develop entrepreneurial skills as well as helping with the continued funding of the project.”

Conservationists say fewer bees means less pollination, which results in less honey and fewer plants.

Change for Charity donated £3,500 for the new project, which was match funded by the school. It also has the support of the Blackpool and Fylde Beekeepers Society, whose president Bill Poole 
attended the project launch at the school.

Change for Charity supports youth projects in the local community. In 1996 it raised over £17,000 to help fund the children’s unit at the Trinity Hospice in Bispham.

Since then it has continued to sponsor various needy causes across the Fylde.

Crowden Collins, chairman of the trustees for Change for Charity, said they are delighted to be able to co-sponsor what they described as a great initiative at Anchorsholme Primary.

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