Dressing appropriately helps ‘raise our children’s aspirations’

A headteacher has written to parents asking them to stop wearing PYJAMAS on the school run.
A headteacher has written to parents asking them to stop wearing PYJAMAS on the school run.
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The growing trend of parents wearing their pyjamas to drop their children off at school hit the headlines after a headteacher wrote to parents asking them to dress appropriately for the school run.

Kate Chisholm, headteacher at Skerne Park Academy in Darlington , told parents that dressing appropriately would help ‘raise our children’s aspirations’ – and it seems Fylde coast parents agree wholeheartedly with her.

A comfortable outfit really isn’t a problem but wash your face, brush your hair and no pyjamas, it’s not hard

Aneliesa Forshaw, 28, from South Shore whose son attends Lytham C E, said: “ I honestly think it’s setting a bad example. By doing the school run in your pyjamas it’s giving the impression you have nothing better to do than laze about watching TV.

“It shows that the parent is most likely going straight back home after dropping their kids off and not going to work, not a very good representation for their children at all.”

Alana Shields, 43, from St Annes, who remembers school runs with her now grown-up children said: “I don’t agree with this at all.

“It doesn’t set a good example to the children.

“If there is a lack of help then parents should address life skills, granted everyone’s circumstances are different but there are quite simple ways to avoid looking like you’ve just hopped out of bed.

“You didn’t see parents wearing pyjamas to school 10 years ago, standards have definitely changed.”

Some parents feel it’s a matter of choice as Claire Bonser, 27, from Lytham, whose daughter attends a St Annes primary school said: “If I’m in a rush, my school run outfit is trackies and UGG boots, which I feel is bad enough but doing the school run is like being at school.

“Parents, especially mums stand around in their groups judging, so if you don’t mind being the topic of conversation, do what you want.

“I try not to judge based on attire but there are comfy clothes you can get without going out in a full set of pyjamas.

“I wouldn’t want my child at risk of being made fun of for my clothing choices.

“However if I’ve been up half the night with a teething child, attempting hair and make up is likely to cause more injury!”

Natalie Gornall, 25, from Poulton, said: “It really is ridiculous. It seems hypocritical to hurry your children up all morning to get ready and dressed for school if the parent decides to turn up in pyjamas.

“How are their children supposed to be encouraged to make themselves presentable if they aren’t leading by example?”

“Also, there are other forms of outerwear that are comfortable and make you look less lazy. A comfortable outfit really isn’t a problem but wash your face, brush your hair and no pyjamas, it’s not hard.”

‘It is important for us to set a good example’

Kate Chisholm, headteacher at Skerne Park Academy, wrote to parents after she noticed a growing number of parents in nightwear on the school run – a practice she fears is becoming the ‘norm’.

She also noted some turned up to school productions and events in dressing gowns and slippers.

In the letter to parents, Mrs Chisholme wrote: “I am sure you will agree that it is important for us all to set a good example about what is appropriate and acceptable in all aspects of life, not only from the point of view of their safety and general well-being but also as a preparation for their own adult life.”

She asked parents to “dress appropriately in day wear” before dropping off their children.

And speaking to the media afterwards, she added: “It is important that parents are role models and for them to see that they should maybe not attend events in nightwear.”