Dog hurt in Blackpool seafront attack

Yorkie Russell Sally, who belongs to Lisa Woodcock and her girlfriend Rebecca Davies, was hurt near North Pier
Yorkie Russell Sally, who belongs to Lisa Woodcock and her girlfriend Rebecca Davies, was hurt near North Pier
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A Blackpool woman has spoken of her anger after her beloved pet dog was attacked while out on a walk.

Lisa Woodcock said the attack happened as she was taking her eight-year-old Yorkie Russell Sally home from the beach near North Pier.

It wouldn’t let go so I started to punch the other dog. If I hadn’t it would have killed her

The 43-year-old hotel worker said a black Staffordshire Bull terrier, being walked off its lead by a man, sank its teeth into Sally’s neck and refused to let go.

The attack left Sally bleeding and in need or emergency care from the vet, although she escaped serious injury.

Lisa, who lives with her girlfriend Rebecca Davies in Derby Road in North Shore, said the attack could have proved fatal if she hadn’t intervened.

She said: “At first I was frozen in fear, wondering what to do.

“I said, ‘Can you get your dog off my dog because it’s trying to kill her?’

“It wouldn’t let go so I started to punch the other dog. If I hadn’t it would have killed her.

“Sally was screaming out in pain and I knew I had to help her.”

Lisa said the dog finally eased its grip after several minutes and she was able to rush Sally to Vets4Pets in Cleveleys, where she was treated and being sent home with two courses of tablets and wounds on her neck that need bathing daily.

“I wanted to punch the man in the face as well. I just hope he can be found,” Lisa, who works at the Stretton Hotel on the Promenade, said.

“Having a vicious dog off the lead is not on.”

Police confirmed the incident had been reported as having happened shortly before 5pm on Tuesday, but said the council’s dog warden was responsible for leading investigations into dog-on-dog attacks.

Earlier this year, The Gazette revealed the number of people on the Fylde coast being admitted to hospital because of dog bites had rocketed, with 50 people in 12 months needing treatment after being bitten.

The most common wounds were to the wrists, hands, head and forearm.”

Residents living in the country’s most deprived areas – which include parts of Blackpool and Fleetwood – are between and two and three times more likely to be attacked by a dog, it was also revealed.

Trevor Cooper, of canine welfare charity Dogs Trust, said the statistics were ‘deeply concerning’, and said: “It is the responsibility of dog owners to ensure their dogs are properly trained and socialised.”