Dino let loose in the school yard...

Fred Manton (front) with Joseph Watson, teacher Niki Duerden, Jade Devlin, Keira Preston and Christine Redstone and Simon Redstone from The Redstone Centre. Below - Keira Preston, eight, with her dinosaur design.

Fred Manton (front) with Joseph Watson, teacher Niki Duerden, Jade Devlin, Keira Preston and Christine Redstone and Simon Redstone from The Redstone Centre. Below - Keira Preston, eight, with her dinosaur design.

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REMEMBER how exciting it was when there was a dog in the playground? Well imagine having a dinosaur in your school grounds.

That is exactly what students at Mayfield Primary School, St Annes, have after an afternoon craft session.

Keira Preston, eight, with her dinosaur design.

Keira Preston, eight, with her dinosaur design.

The Year Four pupils have been creating the small scale brontosaurus from wicker sticks with guidance from professional artists.

It is now to become a permanent feature in the grounds of the St Leonard’s Road East school, to inspire learning about both dinosaurs and nature.

Headteacher Suzanne Fish said: “The children did a brilliant job with it, they were working on it till 5pm at night.

“Their parents even came in to help out too.

“The children did all the work, from carrying the wood into the school quad to bending it into shape and learning how to build the structure.”

The dinosaur was designed by eight-year-old Keira Preston, from St Annes, after her class chose to spend two weeks learning about dinosaurs.

The two-week project was chosen by the eight and nine-year-olds for their Pupil Voice project as part of the school’s new creative curriculum.

Mrs Fish added: “Each year the pupils do a Pupil Voice project, they choose a topic they’d like to learn all about and Year 4 chose dinosaurs. Through building the dinosaur the children learned about the different properties of types of wood, engineering in how to make a stable structure and about seasons as the wood sheds its leaves.”

The brontosaurus’s long neck and tail – although just a fraction of the size of a 23m real one – now stretch across the school’s quad for all the classrooms to look over.

The 24 pupils involved were led by Christine and Simon Redstone from The Redstone Centre, an activity company which specialises in creating living willow structures.