Raider tells of break-in flashbacks

Blenheim House Children's Hospital in Newton Drive

Blenheim House Children's Hospital in Newton Drive

0
Have your say

An alcoholic who burgled a children’s outpatients clinic in Blackpool later handed himself into police because he had flashbacks of having done something bad.

Kieron Hampson caused hundreds of pounds of damage when he broke into Blenheim House on Newton Drive and stole two computer towers and a remote control.

Hampson, 23, of Central Drive, Blackpool, admitted the burglary which happened in June, as well as an offence of having a bladed article in public.

Karen Brooks, prosecuting at Preston Crown Court, said two computer towers were missing from the clinic and a confidential waste paper sack had been emptied out on to the floor.

Cabinets and drawers had been searched and computer monitors in an upstairs office had been knocked over on to desks.

In one room an LCD TV was on the floor with a cracked screen and a fire extinguisher had been used to break the glass in a door.

CCTV showed the defendant kicking at a fire door.

The court heard it cost around £400 for repairs to glass in two doors. The computer towers were found a few hundred metres away by a member of the public.

Hampson later went to Blackpool Police Station and said he was having flashbacks about breaking into a nursery. He had previously been drinking heavily, had a row with his mother and fell down some stairs, ending up being taken to hospital.

He went on to discharge himself from hospital at about 4am and the burglary occurred at around 6.30am. His DNA was found in blood discovered by a fire door at the clinic, which is used by children with physical or learning needs.

Richard English, defending, said Hampson was a long standing alcoholic who used drink to cope with his problems.

He had expressed remorse for the burglary.

Judge Anthony Russell QC gave Hampson a 12 months prison sentence, suspended for two years, with two years supervision.

He was also handed an alcohol treatment programme and a three-month curfew, to run from 8pm to 8am. He must pay a £100 statutory surcharge.

Judge Anthony Russell QC told him “You will decide whether you serve this prison sentence or not. You will have to make sure you do not commit any further offences.”

Follow us on twitter @The_Gazette and like our page on facebook to keep up with all the latest news.