Paedophile loses plea to quash court ruling

APPEAL REJECTED: Kenneth Trotter, who is serving three years in prison, had his appeal against a Sexual Offences Prevention Order rejected by a judge and two magistrates.
APPEAL REJECTED: Kenneth Trotter, who is serving three years in prison, had his appeal against a Sexual Offences Prevention Order rejected by a judge and two magistrates.

A convicted paedophile described as an “exceptionally dangerous man” after he was jailed earlier this year has lost a legal challenge to have a court order quashed.

Kenneth Trotter, 78, who is serving a three-year jail term, had launched an appeal at Preston Crown Court against a Sexual Offences Prevention Order made last November at Blackpool Magistrates’ Court.

But his appeal has been rejected by a judge and two magistrates. Trotter, who was convicted and served a substantial prison sentence for numerous sex offences involving boys and young men in Australia, came back to live in Blackpool last May.

He was jailed for three years in January for twice breaching the SOPO order, which requires him to tell police of a change of address within three days.

He was not at Preston Crown Court when Judge Stuart Baker handed down the latest decision. As well as losing his appeal, Trotter will have to pay £3,000 towards the costs of the case.

His four grounds of appeal had been that his case was not properly conducted by a solicitor acting for him, an appeal against the conviction and sentence in Australia was pending, the application was an abuse of process because his appeal in Australia had not been determined and he therefore could not have a fair hearing here and that he was denied an opportunity at the Magistrates’ Court to give evidence.

But Judge Baker and the magistrates stated in their judgment: “Having considered all the evidence in the case we find that Mr Trotter’s behaviour while in Blackpool demonstrates that he will, if he can find a way to do so, avoid providing the police with a genuine address and he will try to create circumstances in which he can have access to young and probably vulnerable people, to give himself the opportunity to commit sexual offences against them.”

Trotter had voiced concerns that a ban on door to door sales would prevent him from continuing his business as a self employed sewing machine repair man. He also submitted the SOPO would effectively make him homeless, claiming every time the police became aware of where he was staying, or proposing to stay, pressure would be put on a landlord to try to prevent him taking the accommodation.

But the bench found the door-to-door ban was “entirely appropriate” and wouldn’t make it impossible for him to conduct his business.

The judge in January described Trotter as an “exceptionally dangerous man” when he gave him three years’ jail for the two offences of breaking the terms of an interim Sexual Offences Prevention Order.