Ear biting claims at family party

Preston Crown Court
Preston Crown Court
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A BLACKPOOL man allegedly bit off part of a relative’s ear and broke his jaw when a coming-of-age party turned to violence, it has been claimed.

Preston Crown Court was told Gerald McCullion blamed his brother for the bite attack because he had no upper front teeth.

A crime scene investigator ended up photographing his teeth as part of the inquiry into what happened during the family party in Duke Street, South Shore, last Christmas.

McCullion, 33, of St Helier’s Road, South Shore, denies one charge of causing grievous bodily harm with intent, another of inflicting grievous bodily harm and a third of assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

The alleged events happened in the early hours of December 28 following a 21st birthday celebration at The Albert pub on Lytham Road, for a cousin of the defendant.

Amanda Johnson, prosecuting, said there was a good atmosphere in the pub and no trouble. The defendant had been estranged for a number of years from some members of his family.

Most of the family had gone back to an address on Duke Street but McCullion attended uninvited.

At some stage, the defendant began to have a row with his brother, the pair not having spoken for about three years before that night. McCullion went on to storm out of the kitchen, pushing another man as he did so, resulting in him striking his head in the hallway.

The defendant has admitted common assault regarding that person.

The prosecution claimed McCullion later punched his brother three times to the face, knocking out a crown in the process.

In addition, it is alleged he began striking another man who had been trying to split the pair up to the left side of the jaw, effectively stunning him.

McCullion is said to have taken hold of him in a headlock and bit off a large part of one of his ears.

The victim was taken to Blackpool Victoria Hospital with a fractured jaw. The missing part of his ear could not be attached and he needed reconstructive surgery.

Following arrest, McCullion claimed: “It was my brother who bit my uncle’s ear off.”

He also said he had no teeth he could bite with. His teeth were photographed on December 29 by a crime scene investigator. The defendant was missing his incisor upper front teeth.

The jury has been told one dentist will say the missing of molars would compromise the defendant’s ability to bite.

Another would say, in his opinion, McCullion should have adapted to that and that the injury caused was consistent with having been caused by possible canine and upper molars – the side teeth of the jaw.

(proceeding)