Activist Mollie is a conference star

10-year-old Mollie Reeves, pictured with teacher Sue Tyldesley, addressed delegates at the International Women's Conference about women's rights and positive role models

10-year-old Mollie Reeves, pictured with teacher Sue Tyldesley, addressed delegates at the International Women's Conference about women's rights and positive role models

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Hot on the heels of Harry Potter starlet Emma Watson, the Fylde coast boasts its own inspirational women’s rights activist.

Youngster Mollie Reeves joined delegates at the International Women’s Conference in Manchester before taking to the stage to talk about women’s rights and gender equality – at just 10-years-old.

The Rossall School pupil gave a talk to hundreds, including politicians Harriet Harman and Luciana Berger, about the importance of girls and young women having positive female role models.

That same weekend, actress Emma Watson 
addressed a UN conference calling on men to help end gender inequality and clarifying the definition of feminism, in her role as UN Women Goodwill ambassador.

As Miss Watson, who played Hermione in the wizard film series, was criticised by some and saw her clothing critiqued in national press, Mollie commented on how the media often note a woman’s appearance over what she is saying.

She said: “Women’s rights are important, people should focus on what women are saying and not what they look like.”

Mollie attended the conference with her mother, Natalie, and joined a workshop with Labour MP 
Luciana Berger, who campaigns for women’s rights but has been singled out in the media for her looks.

Mollie said she agreed with Emma Watson who called for men to help encourage gender equality.

She added: “I think that women can do whatever job they want, and it’s just as important that men can do ‘women’s’ jobs, too. It doesn’t matter what gender you are.

“I want women to have more confidence to stand up for their rights and men can encourage that.”

The schoolgirl had explored gender issues at her Broadway-based school – which is now led by a female headteacher, Elaine Purves, for the first time in its history.

Teacher Sue Tyldesley said: “It’s a huge sea change to have a female head, it’s good for children to see that women can take on any role.

“We do a lot in school about being open minded and encourage our pupils to be happy to challenge pre-conceived ideas.

“We’re very proud of all our pupils.”

Now Mollie hopes to follow in the footsteps of her own role models, author JK Rowling and MP Harriet Harman, to achieve highly and go for a career in politics.