DCSIMG

Man told wait four hours after 999 call

Happier times: David Kennington and his wife Joyce when, in  1995, he received an MBE after more than 60 years involvement with the Scouts

Happier times: David Kennington and his wife Joyce when, in 1995, he received an MBE after more than 60 years involvement with the Scouts

A family today demanded answers after ambulance staff told them they may have to wait FOUR hours to help assist a cancer-stricken pensioner.

David Kennington, 89, is visited four times a day by carers and his family say they have been told not to try to move him themselves.

But after he managed to get himself to the bathroom unaided at midnight the former Scout leader realised he didn’t have the strength to get up from the toilet and called for help.

His frantic wife Joyce, 84, called the North West Ambulance Service to help him but was left stunned when she was told he may be waiting four hours for paramedics to arrive at their home in Wentworth Drive, Thornton.

She said: “I’m absolutely appalled, how can they leave an old man, shivering, shaking and really distressed?

“I’m 84-years-old, I don’t have the strength to help him.

“I realise they’re over-worked but something should really be done about it, my husband’s situation won’t have been the first and won’t be the last.”

She eventually called her daughter and son-in-law who came round to lift Mr Kennington, who was diagnosed with liver cancer in February, back to his bedroom.

Their nephew Mike Kennington, 77, who lives with the couple, said: “He was an absolute dead weight, we just couldn’t move him.

“We were advised by doctors earlier on in the week that under no circumstances were we to attempt to move him and we should call emergency services.

“We were in despair, really, and if it wasn’t for David’s wife Joyce ringing her daughter and son-in-law to come round and help he could literally have died there and then.

“Luckily, we all managed to get him comfortably back into bed but not without risk.” added Mike.

A spokeswoman from North West Ambulance service said: “We understand that waiting for an ambulance can be distressing for the patient and their family and we are sorry that in this instance, the patient’s family is not happy with the service received.

“To ensure patients are assessed on the basis of their medical need, with those with immediately life-threatening conditions taking priority.

“The family were offered an out of hours GP service and if they would like to discuss the incident further, we would urge them to contact us directly.”

 

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