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Green dream bears fruit in eco garden

Hard working: A community has come together to help rebuild Moor Park Primary Schools eco garden after it was destroyed by vandals

Hard working: A community has come together to help rebuild Moor Park Primary Schools eco garden after it was destroyed by vandals

A school hit by vandals has dug its way back to victory after months of restoring its gardening equipment.

Children at Moor Park Primary School, in Bispham, are now celebrating being able to grow their own fresh fruit and vegetables to sell after months of restoration work was completed.

Vandals targeted the grounds off Moor Park Avenue in mid January, causing thousands of pounds of damage and leaving the children devastated.

But the school’s eco garden, which contains a geo dome and other apparatus, was officially reopened on Friday with a garden party.

Emma Pook, eco co-ordinator at the school, said: “We’ve been working hard to get it back up and running.

“We want to have a broad curriculum for the children which involves plant life and small enterprise.

“Each class has had their own raised bed with carrots, tomatoes, potatoes – that sort of thing.

“They’ve all been growing from scratch.”

The children can now once again sell their produce at events such as school fairs, the proceeds of which are then used to pay for new educational equipment.

Two years ago, the school’s then Year Six class had secured funding for an eco garden, and since then all classes had worked in the outdoor classroom.

But on January 17 pupils arrived at school to find every segment of the dome with a hole punched through, tools broken and empty alcohol bottles dumped in the garden.

Lancashire Police investigated a report of criminal damage.

However, after an appeal in The Gazette, various members of the community, from an artist to labourers and shops and security companies, chipped in to help restore the gardening programme.

Mrs Pook added: “It’s not nice that the children were exposed to learning about vandalism, but it’s nice that they realised something good can come from that.”

The school’s head boy, 11-year-old Connor Gibbins, initially contacted The Gazette about the vandalism.

He said: “It’s a much safer and cleaner area now that it has been revamped.

“We are so grateful to everyone who has helped to make our school a nicer place.” Classmate Nicole Rogers-Thomas, 11, added: “We enjoy planting, watering, tidying and harvesting the food that we have grown.

“We are looking forward to growing and selling lots more produce to our parents and local community.”

 

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