Cash is vital for youth crime fight

Youngsters Leah Hogarth and Brody Ponti with volunteer Lyn Hebden and deputy police and crime commissioner Ibrahim Master.

Youngsters Leah Hogarth and Brody Ponti with volunteer Lyn Hebden and deputy police and crime commissioner Ibrahim Master.

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A vital project which has seen youngsters turn their back on crime has been handed a funding boost.

The triage service targets offenders who are on the path to a life of crime – and makes them understand the gravity of their actions and the consequences they could have.

And today, as it is revealed just 6.6 per cent of youngsters who complete the scheme have gone on to re-offend, organisers Blackpool Council and Child Action North West have been handed £30,000 to continue their work.

The cash has come from Lancashire Police and Crime Commissioner Clive Grunshaw, and deputy commissioner Ibrahim Master who said: “The success of this scheme speaks for itself.

“I am delighted this funding will enable all those involved to continue their good work.”

The service is used as an alternative to prosecution for 10 to 17-year-olds.

Coun Sarah Riding, cabinet member for children’s services, said: “By working closely with the young people, we find we are able to have a big impact on them and steer them away from making the wrong life choices.

“I’m delighted we are able to continue this fantastic work and keep helping children to achieve their full potential in life.”

Young people who come into the service write a letter of apology to their victims and carry out work on projects across town, including work at the Cherry Tree allotments.

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