Worry free way of getting work

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WITH the cost of university courses rocketing to up to £9,000 per year, apprenticeships have never looked so appealing.

Students now face the worry of course expenses, travel, accommodation, and subsistence – coupled with the difficult task of trying to find employment after the course.

Sunderland Catholic Club FC.'Back row, left to right; Asa Dobbing manager, Robbie Thompson, Michael Dodds, Marc Egglestone (captain), Gregg Dixon, Richard Oxman, Ben McClusky and Alan Young.  Front row; Michael Melmoe, Kieran Perez, Ryan Steele, Aaron Dobbing, Fordy Green and Matthew Grassam.

Sunderland Catholic Club FC.'Back row, left to right; Asa Dobbing manager, Robbie Thompson, Michael Dodds, Marc Egglestone (captain), Gregg Dixon, Richard Oxman, Ben McClusky and Alan Young. Front row; Michael Melmoe, Kieran Perez, Ryan Steele, Aaron Dobbing, Fordy Green and Matthew Grassam.

More young people are looking to forestall further academic study and take an apprenticeship route.

Beneast Training and The Gazette have pledged to create 100 apprenticeships in 100 days in our Future Generations campaign, helping small businesses and young people alike.

The scheme aims to get young people into work and training, while helping firms get the best of an enthusiastic young workforce who are trained for free.

Beneast has secured substantial Government funding to deliver training freely to businesses employing apprentices. It covers a vast range of industries and career paths and offers full-time employment at the nationally-agreed minimum wage for an apprentice, while providing free training.

Last year, the campaign was hailed a success after hitting its target. Chief executive of Beneast Training Alison Hall said: “Let’s look at some of the undeniable facts which place employing apprentices at the forefront of business recruitment practices.

“Around 81 per cent of consumers favour using a company which takes on apprentices.

“Employers only pay their salary, the government funds the cost of training, and one in five employers are hiring more apprentices to help them through the tough economic climate.

“The return on investment is significant both for business, skills development for the local economy and for our young people.”

The initiative allows local businesses to offer full-time employment to 16-18 year olds at the nationally agreed minimum wage for an apprentice.

At the same time, employers need to commit to the apprenticeship programme and will be supported free of charge by Beneast. Beneast will also provide a free recruitment service.

There are hundreds of different apprenticeships available from elderly care to IT management.

Future Generations will be launched on February 8 at the Hilton Hotel, Blackpool.

Business owners interested in finding out how apprentices can be a benefit to them should visit http://bit.ly/dER3cM or call (01253) 756400.