Workers add steel to key resort road

From left, Blackpool Council principal engineer Will Britain, Coun John Jones, and Blackpool Council director of environmental services John Blackledge (second right) with representatives from contractor Galliford, at Yeadon Way.
From left, Blackpool Council principal engineer Will Britain, Coun John Jones, and Blackpool Council director of environmental services John Blackledge (second right) with representatives from contractor Galliford, at Yeadon Way.
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Steel sheets are being sunk into Yeadon Way as engineers work to repair the key route.

Barriers and the road surface have now been stripped away as contractors strive to get the road back open in time for Easter.

The three kilometre route has been closed to traffic since the end of the Illuminations, to enable a £3.6m renovation to be undertaken.

The Government agreed to fund the scheme after warnings the road, which links the motorway to the town centre car and coach parks, could collapse if nothing was done.

Coun John Jones, cabinet member for highways and transport on Blackpool Council, visited the site to get an update on progress from contractors Galliford Try.

He said: “Work is progressing well, and I’m pleased Galliford Try are engaging with local residents, businesses and organisations to keep them informed.

“We stressed the importance of the work being completed in time for the Easter holidays because of the huge impact the start of the tourism season has on the local economy.

“We will keep residents informed of progress as the project continues.”

It is understood the work is on schedule.

The work includes sinking steel sheet piles up to 18 metres deep in order to improve the stability of the road where weak points have been identified.

Engineers have removed the existing road surface and barriers to enable this to be carried out.

Repairs are also being done to secure the embankments, which have become weaker over time. The sides are very steep and would not be built at that angle in modern day construction.

Drainage is also being improved and repairs are already having a positive effect.

The road, which opened in 1986 and carries seven million cars a year, includes five bridges, some of which have suffered severe cracking.

Thousands of metres of watercourses and hundreds of gullies alongside Yeadon Way are also being cleared, as part of the scheme.

For more information about the progress of the repair work, people can visit www.blackpool.gov.uk/yeadonway