Tattoo parlour in human ashes rap

The family of Leah Mills, who tragically died following a routine gall-bladder operation, have all had tattoos in her memory using ink mixed with a little of Leah's ashes. Pictured showing their tattoos are Leah's mum Karen Innes, sister Donna Mills, and step-sister and -brother Melissa and Chris Innes.

The family of Leah Mills, who tragically died following a routine gall-bladder operation, have all had tattoos in her memory using ink mixed with a little of Leah's ashes. Pictured showing their tattoos are Leah's mum Karen Innes, sister Donna Mills, and step-sister and -brother Melissa and Chris Innes.

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A tattoo parlour has been rapped by council bosses for mixing human ashes with its ink.

The family of 23-year-old mum-of-two Leah Mills, who died following a routine operation to remove her gallbladder, had tattoos inscribed with ink containing her ashes at Blackpool tattoo parlour, Get Your Tats Out.

Karen Innes, Leah’s mum, and her three children had the tattoos done as a permanent reminder of the former Collegiate High School pupil.

But now the tattoo parlour, based on Foxhall Road, has been told not to continue the practice by Blackpool Council.

Tim Coglan, head of public protection at Blackpool Council, said: “I can confirm we have served a prohibition notice on a tattoo parlour and a particular tattooist which prevents them for using ashes within tattoo ink.

“Local by-laws state ink used in tattooing must be clean and there is no guarantee that it will be if it contains other materials.

“People’s bodies can often contain harmful substances such as mercury within fillings and other metals which could be extremely harmful to health and are not necessarily removed by incineration.

“There is no control over the conditions in which ashes are kept following incineration which could also lead to contamination.

“This practice is discouraged and we would advise anyone considering it to research the potential health implications.”

Jason Slater, the tattoo artist who drew the design, said: “They don’t know whether it’s a health and safety issue due to fillings and things like that, they’ve just given us a warning. We won’t do it again.”

Leah’s sister Donna, 25, from central Blackpool, said: “Lots of places advertise this, that’s where we got the idea from. They wouldn’t have done it if they knew they weren’t allowed. They were kind and considerate.”