‘Filthy’ Blackpool store was a ‘danger’ to health

Inspectors  found equipment caked in meat at Spiceland on Central Drive
Inspectors found equipment caked in meat at Spiceland on Central Drive
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The butchery area of a town centre store was branded ‘filthy’ after inspectors found it strewn with meat.

Magistrates were told the meat department of the Spiceland store on Central Drive was so overstocked it was impossible the clean properly.

Inspectors  found equipment caked in meat at Spiceland on Central Drive

Inspectors found equipment caked in meat at Spiceland on Central Drive

Equipment was encrusted with meat and the freezers were dirty.

Shpour Khan, of Manor Drive, Cleveleys, admitted six offences under the Food Hygiene Act when he appeared before Blackpool Magistrates.

The 29-year-old, who the court heard was involved in the ownership of the shop and was the registered food operator, was fined £200 and ordered to pay £230 court costs.

The hearing was told he was now unemployed after leaving the business immediately following an inspection by a council team.

The floors were dirty, as were the walls of the butchery which were flanking paint. Remains of meat were found on a burger maker and a meat cutting block

Lynda Bennett, prosecuting for Blackpool Council, told how Spiceland had undergone a series of visits from council staff. The store had also been issued with warning notices about its state.

She said: “The floors were dirty, as were the walls of the butchery which were flanking paint. Remains of meat were found on a burger maker and a meat cutting block.

“Other food was found in bin bags and there was bread alongside uncooked meat on one of the freezers which can cause cross-contamination and a danger to public health.”

“There were also gaps in the written monitoring records the defendant was supposed to keep.”

“The defendant started work at the shop in 2014 and an inspection in June last year revealed the butchery area was filthy with meat all over the place.

“It was overstocked making cleaning impossible.”

The court heard Spiceland received a zero rating out of a possible five from the council.

Trevor Colebourne, defending, said that his client may have been the food business operative at times but he was merely an employee .

“He was paid a wage but he did not own the business. I am told that the problems have now been put right.

“To some extent he has been a scapegoat in all of this.”

Coun Gillian Campbell, deputy leader of Blackpool Council, said: “Anybody who serves food to the public has a legal and moral duty to ensure that their business is clean and hygienic.

“Our food hygiene officers work night and day to protect locals and visitors from dirty eateries and if anybody falls below the legal standards then we will not hesitate to bring about enforcement action.

“Let’s be clear, most food premises in Blackpool are clean and hygienic but we will not hesitate to act if we find businesses serving food to the public in unsafe conditions.”