Big brew for a fairer deal

Students from Highfield Humanities College host a Big Brew tea party to raise awareness of fair trade goods. Pictured is Heather Alder and George Ogden and (below) Natalia Nosowska with deputy mayoress Angela Matthews.
Students from Highfield Humanities College host a Big Brew tea party to raise awareness of fair trade goods. Pictured is Heather Alder and George Ogden and (below) Natalia Nosowska with deputy mayoress Angela Matthews.
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DRINKING tea has real meaning for pupils at this South Shore school.

Youngsters from Highfield Humanities College put the kettle on for a whole host of invited guests.

Natalia Nosowska with deputy mayoress Angela Matthews.

Natalia Nosowska with deputy mayoress Angela Matthews.

The event – called The Big Brew – is run by charity Traidcraft and designed to raise awareness of fair trade.

Pupils not only served up tea and coffee but cookies and cakes which are all made by organisations who ensure workers have earned a decent wage.

The event is part of Fairtrade Fortnight 2012 and was a great success according to teacher Michell Nuttall.

She said: “We were all very pleased with how the Big Brew went as Highfield is committed to raising awareness of Fair Trade. The children sent out the invitations and served all the drinks themselves.”

Highfield achieved Fair Trade status last year for their work promoting the issue.

The Fairtrade concept promotes decent working conditions, sustainability and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers in the developing world.

Invited guests included Deputy Mayor and mayoress of Blackpool Coun Allan and Angela Matthews as well a representative of MP Gordon Marsden, staff from the Blesma home and Highfield Day Care Centre.

And pupils enjoyed the experience. Heather Alder, 14 said: “It was really good to promote Fair Trade in our community.

“I didn’t use to know very much about it but we did a few assemblies on the issue and it really got me thinking.

“Many people don’t know how little workers in other countries can get, the work of Fair Trade is really important.”

Becky Cooper, 15 added: “Fair Trade really can save lives, more people need to be aware of the brands.

“I joined the school Fair Trade group after learning about the different in pay people get when they work for a Fair Trade company.

“The extra money we pay doesn’t make a big difference to us but it can be the difference between life and death in other parts of the world.”

George Ogden, 13 added: “Finding out about Fair Trade really got me thinking about conditions in other countries.

“It has made me a lot more aware of the products I buy and I encourage my mum to buy Fair Trade products when I can.”

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