Avenue of great oaks from little grey tubes

At the planting (from left) Linda Gray of the Friends of Kingscote Park, Community Engagement Officer Tim Riley and Julie Barrett, vice-chairman, Friends of Kingscote Park.
At the planting (from left) Linda Gray of the Friends of Kingscote Park, Community Engagement Officer Tim Riley and Julie Barrett, vice-chairman, Friends of Kingscote Park.
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THEY seemed to arrive overnight and have caused great discussion among local residents and park users.

But from these small grey tubes, it is hoped, great oaks will grow.

Layton’s Kingscote Park has been transformed with the planting of 5,000 trees thanks to a £11,280 cash injection from the Forestry Commission.

Arranged around the outside edge of the field and in a series of clusters, the oaks, elms and other native species will create an elegant avenue of trees and small wildlife copses.

The planting is the latest part of the Kingscote Park masterplan which has already seen new play equipment, shrubbery and a ‘natural play area’ installed over recent year.

Children from the nearby Layton Primary School have also been out this spring planting daffodil bulbs to help brighten things up.

Julie Barrett, vice chair of the Friends of Kingscote Park, is delighted with the scheme. “We asked for some trees to replace those lost to Dutch Elm Disease and storms over the years to enhance the park and create an avenue of trees lining the perimeter. There’s a lot of work being put in by the Friends and the council to improve the park and this shows what can be achieved, we hope it brings people a lot of pleasure.”

Funding comes from a pot designated for tree planting and park improvements as part of the Lancashire-wide waste management contract with Global Renewables. Not all of the 5,000 saplings planted will reach maturity, about 30 years from now, with disease, storm damage and vandalism likely to reduce density.

Tim Riley. from Blackpool’s neighbourhood services team .says the park improvement project is ongoing and urges the community to get involved.

“This all started with a consultation in 2009 and we have been working closely with the Friends group and Parklands area forum on developing an implementing the plan.

“There’s still a lot of green open space for children to play but the tree planting creates something different and will help with drainage as the trees lower the water table.”

Not everyone is happy with the scheme however. Stan Thompson from Kingscote Drive, said: “They just turned up out of the blue and people are not happy that they will lose their view of the park with all these trees in the way.”

The work forms part of the Lancashire-wide ‘Woodlands from Waste’ programme that has, over the last two years, planted 76,000 woodland trees, plus 522 specimen trees on 23 sites Anyone wanting to get involved The Friends of Kingscote Park next meets at 7pm on March 11 at the Sure Start Centre on Grenfell Avenue.

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