Action call over rat run through village

CounJohn Singleton and residents of Westfield Avenue in Staining are calling for tighter regulation and monitoring of vehicles which speed and use their road as a 'rat-run'  short cut. John (left) and residents on the street.
CounJohn Singleton and residents of Westfield Avenue in Staining are calling for tighter regulation and monitoring of vehicles which speed and use their road as a 'rat-run' short cut. John (left) and residents on the street.
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Villagers are demanding action to prevent their streets being used as a rat run by speeding drivers.

People living in Westfield Avenue, Whiteholme Avenue and Schofield Avenue, Staining, say drivers are using the streets to avoid the main junction where Normoss Road meets Staining Road.

They also say motorists are flouting 20mph restrictions.

Now calls have been made for highways chiefs to step in and take action before there is a serious accident.

A survey of residents found the majority would like to see speed bumps installed.

Mack Duerden, Neighbourhood Watch co-ordinator for the area, said: “Some drivers are travelling at 50 or 60mph so it is really dangerous, and has been for some time.

“We are getting hundreds of vehicles a day using what should be a quiet residential road. There was a collision two or three weeks ago when a lady broke her shoulder.

“I have canvassed residents and people still want it to be a through route but they want some form of safety measures.

“The favourite option is for speed bumps.”

Staining councillor John Singleton said: “Westfield Avenue and Whitemoss Avenue are two quiet roads in a semi-rural area of Fylde operating a 20mph zone, and during daylight hours and the summer holidays children play out on the pavement.

“Motorists are, and have been for some considerable time, using these residential avenues as a short cut in order to avoid the main Normoss Road and Staining Road junction and blatantly disregarding the 20mph signs.

“Sooner or later there will be an accident on this route unless County Hall becomes more pro-active in accident prevention.”

Coun Singleton added residents had used speed guns with the help of their police community support officer (PCSO) to measure how fast traffic was travelling.

Sim Lane-Dixon, Lancashire County Council’s highways manager for Fylde, said: “In response to local residents’ concerns, we are working closely with the police and officers from our 20mph team with a view to identifying and resolving current problems within the area.”

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