Once horrified to be called a pub?

Then and Now: Manchester Hotel on Blackpool Promenade seen on a 1904 picture postcard in the collection of reader Carol Ford who also supplies a photograph of the current pub.

Then and Now: Manchester Hotel on Blackpool Promenade seen on a 1904 picture postcard in the collection of reader Carol Ford who also supplies a photograph of the current pub.

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Regular Memory Lane contributor and post card collector Carol Ford has been out and about with her camera again.

She has taken a photograph of the current Manchester Hotel at the junction of Blackpool Promenade and Lytham Road.

Then and Now: Manchester Hotel on Blackpool Promenade seen on a 1904 picture postcard in the collection of reader Carol Ford who also supplies a photograph of the current pub.

Then and Now: Manchester Hotel on Blackpool Promenade seen on a 1904 picture postcard in the collection of reader Carol Ford who also supplies a photograph of the current pub.

Carol also shares a 1904 postcard view and says: “This early picture was taken at a time when the Manchester looked so genteel and would probably have been horrified to be called a pub.”

She adds: “The only sign that it was a business at all was a small board at the door, no doubt stating what rooms or drinks it served.

“I do hope that elegant lady heading for the door wasn’t intending to go inside licensed premises alone. Heaven forbid!”

The Manchester was once the first port of call for many a party arriving at the Coliseum coach station in nearby Tyldesley Road.

The Manchester Hotel, Blackpool, in 1952

The Manchester Hotel, Blackpool, in 1952

But there have been several Manchester buildings on the same site at the junction of Lytham Road and the

seafront – commonly known as Manchester Square.

Back in the late 1800s it was Hemingway’s Manchester Hotel, later becoming part of the C & S Brewery estate.

That company demolished and rebuilt the pub, which was there from 1936, surviving 60 years with internal and external facelifts - and we are also featuring a photograph from 1952. There’s a rare sight in the centre of the road that you rarely ever see today - a policeman on point duty!

Brewer Bass was forced to rebuild it because the building’s steel frame was becoming corroded.

This move angered local historians who felt the classic pieceof 1930s artdeco should have been listed.

But the building’s fate was decided when the Department of National Heritage turned down an application for listed status and the current redbrick version opened in May 1996.

Do you have any old pictures of Fylde scenes to feature in Then and Now? If so email craig.fleming@blackpoolgazette.co.uk

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